Yesterday's Ghost

ここでは昔こんなことがあったんだよ、とか、実はこんな曰く付きの場所なんだ、とか自分が生まれる前の出来事について聞いたり、誰かが残した痕跡に出会うと、今目の前にある風景が何だかさっきまでとは違って見えたり、何かの気配を感じてしまうことがあります。想像がつきそうでつかない過去は、まるで実体のない幽霊のようです。

戦時中に日本で作られ現在も捨てられたままになっている陶製手榴弾と、その上に建つ住宅街の景色を基にした『ざくろ』。

海岸に漂着した無数の陶片を拾い集めながら、目の前の海に浮かぶ輸送コンテナ船や埠頭と重ねた『DRIFT』。

小笠原諸島にまつわる作品たちは、今では「南の楽園」として観光地になっている島で、少しずつ薄れていく「日本と米国の間で翻弄された島民たちの190年間の歴史」を日本人観光客としての私の視点で調べながら制作したものです。

 

「自分が直接経験していないその土地の過去の出来事」を題材に、その場所で垣間見る幽霊について考えながら制作をしています。

 

 

===========

There are times when, after hearing a story or urban legend about a certain place, its landscape,  saturated with the traces of the past, is no longer experienced in the same way, and I sense heretofore unnoticed presences. The unreachable past is like a ghost that has yet to take shape. 


Some works, like “Zakuro,” are based on the residential housing built above World War II-era ceramic grenades that are still buried in the ground, undetonated. Others, such as “Drift," are drawn from the experience of watching shipping containers traveling to and from the coast along with the countless pieces of pottery that drift to shore. Recent works have alsoincluded a focus on the Ogasawara (or Bonin) Islands, today a popular Japanese tourist destination popularly dubbed “Minami-no-Rakuen” (trans. Paradise of the South) but with a traumatic and rapidly-fading past of American military control — a past that I myself, as a Japanese tourist, attempt to grapple with.  

 

Derived from my lack of firsthand experiences with these phenomena, my artistic practice considers the glimpses of the ghosts of the past that we can bear witness to in a particular place and time.